World’s most popular TED-talker tells Texas conference public education can be fixed — but not quickly

Sir Ken Robinson talks during the Edshift conference at Omni Hotel Mandalay in Las Colinas, TX, on Jan. 11, 2015. (Jason Janik/Special Contributor)

“You can test as much as you like, but if you aren’t cultivating the basic principles of teaching and learning — the central part of the reform movement — then the tests will just keep telling you you’re failing. Because you are.” – Sir Ken Robinson

Article Credit: The Dallas Morning News

http://educationblog.dallasnews.com/2016/01/worlds-most-popular-ted-talker-tells-texas-conference-public-education-can-be-fixed-but-not-quickly.html/

Sir Ken Robinson is a British education expert and author whose 2006 TED talk “Do schools kill creativity?” is the most watched talk in the history of the TED program, with more than 27 million online viewings. One official TED blog called him the “sneezing baby panda of the TED ecosystem.”

Partly, his presentation and its sequels continue to attract an audience because he’s an academic with the delivery of a standup comic. Partly, though, he hits a nerve: “My contention is that creativity now is as important in education as literacy, and we should treat it with the same status,” he said. “…[W]e’re now running national education systems where mistakes are the worst thing you can make. And the result is that we are educating people out of their creative capacities.”

Robinson was in North Texas this week keynoting EdShift2016, a national conference of school officials seeking to come up with better ways to make public education more successfully engaging. In his speech, Robinson offered this observation:

“We know what good teaching looks like. We know what’s wrong with assessment.”

Afterward, he sat down for a conversation. Here are some excerpts:

 

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