Splash Day Fun!

What better way to welcome the new season of summer, than to celebrate with a fun Splash Day!

Our friends enjoyed a variety of water activities including a large inflatable water slide, water tables, sprinklers, and other toys to explore and have fun with. This is how we beat the heat at HBMH!

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Look Who’s Talking! A Child’s Thirst for Language Development

“Words are your [child’s] best friends. They are bridges of understanding and passages that seed all of humanity.” (Montessori Today, Paula Polk Lillard)

A child thirsts for new language like they thirst for water. They crave new language experiences for many reasons; to be in touch with their surroundings, engaged in their environment, and to communicate with others around them. We want to provide a variety of language opportunities for children, especially between the ages of birth to six years, when the child is in the “sensitive period” for language development.

At HBMH, our community is well equipped with language-rich learning opportunities. We talk to the children and adult with respect, modeling how to interact in a positive, productive way. We model grace and courtesy so the child understands proper social interactions. Every lesson is an opportunity to expand upon the child’s language development.

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In Montessori, we discourage talking to a newborn in a “baby voice”. Instead, we carry on conversations and talk to them as if talking to another adult. We share stories with them, and encourage them to respond. We “coo” in response to their little noises to show that their words and noises matter, and that they can communicate their needs through language. Our tone of voice conveys a specific message and emotion. We tell them what we’re going to do before we do it. For instance, “I’m going to pick you up”, or “I’m going to wipe your nose”, and so forth. Continue reading

The New Preschool Is Crushing Kids, Erika Christakis, the Atlantic

Step into an American preschool classroom today and you are likely to be bombarded with what we educators call a print-rich environment, every surface festooned with alphabet charts, bar graphs, word walls, instructional posters, classroom rules, calendars, schedules, and motivational platitudes—few of which a 4-year-old can “decode,” the contemporary word for what used to be known as reading.

Because so few adults can remember the pertinent details of their own preschool or kindergarten years, it can be hard to appreciate just how much the early-education landscape has been transformed over the past two decades. The changes are not restricted to the confusing pastiche on classroom walls. Pedagogy and curricula have changed too, most recently in response to the Common Core State Standards Initiative’s kindergarten guidelines. Much greater portions of the day are now spent on what’s called “seat work” (a term that probably doesn’t need any exposition) and a form of tightly scripted teaching known as direct instruction, formerly used mainly in the older grades, in which a teacher carefully controls the content and pacing of what a child is supposed to learn.

Continue reading

A Helping Friend

Throwback Thursday – 6 years strong

Happy Valentine’s Day!

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Our primary friends made special cookies and Valentines treats for a special cookie exchange. It was fun to see their faces light up when they received a cookie, and how happy and generous they were when sharing their baked goods with their friends.

DSC_0273DSC_0268DSC_0280DSC_0285We incorporated a few Valentines-themed activities to the shelves, for the children to enjoy this holiday. Pin-pricking hearts was very popular. DSC_0272

DIY Montessori: Stringing

imageWhat you’ll need:

  • felt or foam shapes
  • pipe cleaners (or string)

One of my son’s favorite things to do is string beads, or shapes onto string. We chose pipe cleaners today. This sensorial DIY Montessori work is great for fine motor refinement, concentration, small muscle control, and hand-eye coordination. I couldn’t cut shapes fast enough to keep up with my little one!

Here are a few other DIY stringing activities to try at home:

Large Bead Stringing – Carrots are Orange

Montessori-Oriented Pipe-Cleaner-and-Bead Valentine’s Day Activity – Living Montessori Now

Montessori Lacing Beads for Toddlers – Fine Motor Development Practical Life – Natural Wood Toy – Etsy

Toddler Bead Boxes – It’s Our Long Story

Happy DIY-ing!

World Map

🌍 #worldmap #painting #writing #afghanistan #primary #montessori

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Happy Birthday HBMH!