What’s on the Menu Today?

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Too beautiful to not capture with a photo. Our friends enjoyed a delicious, wholesome lunch today of homemade chicken noodle soup mixed with a colorful medley of freshly chopped vegetables, and corn muffins on the side. Just about everyone asked for seconds and thirds.

The perfect meal to help get our week started right!

Fresh from the Garden

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What’s on the menu today?

Fresh greens and vegetables from the garden, hand-picked and prepared by our very own Kiwi toddler students. Complete with fresh lettuce, parsley, basil, radishes, grape tomatoes, hand-tossed in a vinaigrette dressing. This, along with fresh, steamed carrots, complemented the pizza perfectly!

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Summer Camp at HBMH – 2016

Summer Camp at HBMH – 2016

What’s for lunch today?

A beautiful tossed salad, of course. Complete with organic romaine lettuce and kale, topped with fresh grapefruit and oranges, and olive oil. The lettuce was home-grown here in our very own garden, and the fruit was provided from the Kiwi class’ fruit and vegetable basket (thank you, freinds!). Tasty and nutritional is how we like to keep it here at Healthy Beginnings Montessori House!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving, from our HBMH family to yours!

Today was a day filled with fun, food, and friends! We celebrated the holiday with baking, craft making, reading Thanksgiving books, and of course, our traditional feast.

DSC_0400DSC_0399DSC_0369Our Apple friends made place mats, describing what they’re most thankful for.DSC_0364DSC_0394DSC_0396DSC_0397Our friends enjoyed tasty chicken, corn, vegetables, delicious sweet potatoes, cranberries, with muffins and pumpkin pie for dessert. – Thank you Ms. Tami for creating our feast (and Apple & Pear children for baking our tasty deserts!)
DSC_0380DSC_0384DSC_0403DSC_0388DSC_0370DSC_0373Tiny fingers explore new textures of the fruits and vegetables.
DSC_0361DSC_0358DSC_0359Happy Thanksgiving!

Vine Video of the Day: Banana Muffins

The Art of Table Setting

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Today, I had the opportunity to witness a few of our primary community members prepare the tables for lunch. Although they carried out this work flawlessly, it did seem quite challenging. They are required to take one item at a time, carrying it from the cabinet to the table, which can take several minutes. It truly did resemble a form of art, placing each item carefully on the table in the correct order.

What impressed me most was the dialogue that was shared between our two, pre-selected lunch helpers.

“Can you help me tie my apron, please?”

“Here, you lay out the napkins while I do the spoons.”

“We need to get the water from the refrigerator, but I need your help.”

“Would you hand me the napkin?”

I enjoyed hearing these two young people interact and collaborate with one another. It was truly delightful! They found pure joy in the work they were doing, and carried themselves in such a way that they knew this was important and purposeful work.

Not once did I see the guides intervene because it was simply not necessary. She didn’t step in to correct their errors, or straighten a napkin that was slightly offset. The task was carried out in full by the two friends, who relied on one another for help.Tabel Setting_4Setting the table can be defined by many adults as a “chore”, but for a child, it is a purposeful, meaningful, and fulfilling work that stimulates all of their senses. Through this work, they enhance their concentration as they focus on each minor detail, self-control as they learn to carry one item at a time, critical thinking through exploring and manipulating different styles of place setting, collaboration, delegation, and leadership skills, care of environment and care of others, and they develop a healthy self-image because the work is real and necessary. And because of this, we cannot call it a “chore” since it is joyful, purposeful work. Just like an artist carefully and meticulously paints or sculpts his masterpiece, so do our children carefully and meticulously complete their work.

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They understand that this is important work, and gain self-confidence as they see the outcome of their efforts; a room full of happy children eating and socializing in a well prepared environment.

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Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy, Victoria L. Dunckley, M.D.

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Victoria L. Dunckley, M.D. in association with Psychology Today

6 Ways electronic screen time makes kids angry, depressed and unmotivated

The child or teen who is “revved up” and prone to rages or—alternatively—who is depressed and apathetic has become disturbingly commonplace.  Chronically irritable children are often in a state of abnormally high arousal, and may seem “wired and tired.”  That is, they’re agitated but exhausted.  Because chronically high arousal levels impact memory and the ability to relate, these kids are also likely to be struggling academically and socially.

At some point a child with these symptoms is likely to be given a mental health diagnosis, such as major depression, bipolar disorder, or ADHD, and offered corresponding treatments, including therapy and medication.  But often, particularly in today’s world, these treatments don’t work very well, and the downward spiral continues. What’s happening? Continue reading

Photo of the Day: Summer Gardening

Baby peppers, cantaloupe, tomatoes, fresh basil and beautiful flowers continue to grow in this tremendous summer heat! Thank you to our young friends for making sure our plants get plenty of water to drink each day!

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Letting Your Child Help in the Kitchen

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“Influenced, perhaps, by my early experience at a Montessori school… I am all for encouraging children to work productively with their hands…. It is good to give them knives, for instance, as early as you dare…. to slice a hard-boiled egg neatly and then to fillet a fish. Talk to children as you plan menus. Let their small, sensitive noses sniff the fish as you shop.”
—Julia Child, Julia Child & Company

Julia Child encouraged children as young as four years old to fillet fish! But, don’t worry – you can start small and work up to such gourmet endeavors. Young children have a keen desire to participate in everyday family life and love to help in the kitchen. With your guidance they can learn to do so much: preparing snacks and meals, serving, and cleaning up are fun activities that support your child’s growing independence and contribute to the family’s well-being.

The Child-Friendly Kitchen

A child-friendly kitchen includes a low table and chair for eating or working and a low cupboard equipped with child-size dishes, flatware, cooking equipment, and non-perishable food. Reserve a low shelf in the refrigerator for a container with prepared snacks such as cheese and apple slices, and a child-size pitcher of milk or juice. Show your child how to safely grasp, carry, and pour from the pitcher with two hands. Continue reading