A Helping Friend

Happy Valentine’s Day!


Our primary friends made special cookies and Valentines treats for a special cookie exchange. It was fun to see their faces light up when they received a cookie, and how happy and generous they were when sharing their baked goods with their friends.

DSC_0273DSC_0268DSC_0280DSC_0285We incorporated a few Valentines-themed activities to the shelves, for the children to enjoy this holiday. Pin-pricking hearts was very popular. DSC_0272

My Child’s Teacher is 6 Years Old


No matter what side of the argument you stand on, there is concrete evidence and scientific proof that mixed ages in one classroom can be very beneficial. Starting in her earliest primary communities, Dr. Maria Montessori incorporated children as young as 2.5 years in a classroom with children as old as 6 years. This is a very common practice in many Montessori schools today, including our precious HBMH.

For many parents, putting their young 2.5 year old in a classroom with much older students (sometimes over the age of 6), can be quite intimidating. Especially if their child has never been in a daycare setting before. Children grow exponentially between 3 and 6 years of age. It’s quite impressive to see what the younger ones are capable of doing while learning and growing under the leadership and influence of students twice their age.

In Montessori, we want the materials to teach the children, allowing them to work independently. The same goes for their fellow peers; we want the older children to teach, guide, lead, influence, and motivate their younger friends. Through this structure, the younger students observe and imitate the older student’s actions, and the older students gain leadership skills as they guide and support their fellow classmates. They learn to be patient and compassionate for those who rely on them for help. Competition in the classroom is eliminated because every child is at a different stage of learning.

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Children learn more readily from other children than they do from adults…think of when you used to play “school” with your other childhood friends. It comes naturally to our little ones.

Maria Montessori observed that children are eager to learn, and she identified self-directed, observational learning as a central theme of childhood. Describing the phenomenon of observational learning in a multi-age group, Montessori wrote that the child “…suddenly becomes aware of his companions, and is almost as deeply interested as we are in the progress of their work.”

Through my observations in our primary community, I’ve witnessed multiple occasions of older students voluntarily helping their younger friends. I’ve witnessed lessons being given between the two, as if they themselves were the Guide. I’ve seen a 5 year old help a younger friend carry a full water pitcher to the hand washing basin, showing them how to walk with much precision while balancing the container, carefully placing one foot in front of the other. I’ve watched as older students volunteered their time to help roll up nap rolls for those who couldn’t yet do it themselves, tutoring them on each careful step. I have to restrain myself from interfering when I see a young child struggling to carry a full block of knobbed-cylinders, and watch as it tumbles to the floor, because I know that it will only take a few seconds for their older friends to rush over and help clean up the work. These opportunities are so precious to our older students, and play a large role in their growth and development.

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Angeline Stoll Lillard describes the Montessori multi-age setting this way, “Montessori encourages learning from peers in part by using three-year age groupings. This ensures that as children move through the classroom they will be exposed to older and younger peers, facilitating both imitative learning and peer tutoring… Dr. Montessori was quite clear about the need for this mix of ages.” (Montessori: The Schience Behind the Genius)

In conclusion, many parents look at a multi-age classroom and ask, “How does one teacher take care of so many students with such an age difference?”. The answer is simple…she doesn’t. The only way this is possible is with the help and participation from the older students. They know their expectations and roles in the community, and take on the role of being a leader, guiding and teaching their younger peers. Montessori is beautiful in this way; the children work together in a harmonious and peaceful learning environment, helping one another to achieve their full learning potential.

Leaf Pile

I had to capture a few photos of our friends enjoying a leaf pile. You would have thought it was the best day of their lives! They spent almost an hour gathering the leaves (by hand), making a pile, and then taking turns jumping in the pile, or throwing them up in the air. It was a great alternative activity for this cold, wintry day!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving, from our HBMH family to yours!

Today was a day filled with fun, food, and friends! We celebrated the holiday with baking, craft making, reading Thanksgiving books, and of course, our traditional feast.

DSC_0400DSC_0399DSC_0369Our Apple friends made place mats, describing what they’re most thankful for.DSC_0364DSC_0394DSC_0396DSC_0397Our friends enjoyed tasty chicken, corn, vegetables, delicious sweet potatoes, cranberries, with muffins and pumpkin pie for dessert. – Thank you Ms. Tami for creating our feast (and Apple & Pear children for baking our tasty deserts!)
DSC_0380DSC_0384DSC_0403DSC_0388DSC_0370DSC_0373Tiny fingers explore new textures of the fruits and vegetables.
DSC_0361DSC_0358DSC_0359Happy Thanksgiving!

Photo of the Day: Pizza


Enjoying a pizza party under the gazebo with friends, on this beautiful Friday afternoon.

On the menu for today: tasty cheese pizza, organic milk, and refreshing watermelon…yum!

This is how our toddler community celebrated International Day of Peace on Monday; peaceful yoga and friendship hugs.