Montessori Approach vs. Traditional Education

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Montessori Classroom

(A traditional classroom setting vs. a typical Montessori work cycle in motion)

 

 

 

 

 

Many new Montessori parents join into this educational philosophy with slight skepticism about whether or not this is the right decision for their child. Because Montessori is very non-traditional, often times their main concern is if their chlid will be prepared for the 21st century. Montessori is different from “traditional education” in so many ways.

“Montessori emphasizes learning through all five senses, not just through listening, watching, or reading. Children in Montessori classes learn at their own, individual pace and according to their own choice of activities from hundreds of possibilities. Learning is an exciting process of discovery, leading to concentration, motivation, self-discipline, and a love of learning. Montessori classes place children in three-year age groups (3-6, 6-9, 9-12, and so on), forming communities in which the older children spontaneously share their knowledge with the younger ones. Montessori represents an entirely different approach to education.” (http://www.montessori-namta.org/FAQ/Montessori-Education/What-is-the-difference-between-Montessori-and-traditional-education)

Another supportive quote shared from healthybeginningsmontessori.com:

“If we decided that the purpose of education should be to help every child’s brain reach its highest developmental potential, we would have to radically rethink school. The task seems insurmountable, yet this work has already been done. In fact, it was done over a hundred years ago. When examined through the lens of environmental enrichment and brain development, Montessori education presents a radically different- and radically effective- educational approach that may be the best method we’ve got to ensure the optimal cognitive, social, and emotional development of every child.” (Steve Hughes, PhD, LP, ABPdN, Director of the Center for Research on Developmental Education)

So, which do you think is better?

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